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Workshops

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Sunday, May 13, 2001

W1
2nd International Workshop on Living with Inconsistency

One Day

Steve Easterbrook and
Marsha Chechik,
University of Toronto, Canada

Contact:
Steve Easterbrook
sme@cs.toronto.edu

Call for participation

In software engineering, there has long been a recognition that inconsistency is a fact of life. Evolving descriptions of software artefacts are frequently inconsistent, and tolerating this inconsistency is important if flexible collaborative working is to be supported. This workshop will focus on reasoning in the presence of inconsistency, for a wide range of software engineering activities, such as building and exploring requirements models, validating specifications, verifying correctness of implementations, monitoring runtime behaviour, and analyzing development processes. A particular interest is on how existing automated approaches such as model checking, theorem proving, logic programming, and model-based reasoning can still be applied in the presence of inconsistency.

Sunday, May 13, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W2
4th ICSE Workshop on Software Engineering over the Internet

One Day

Frank Maurer,
University of Calgary, Canada;
Barbara Dellen,
Fraunhofer IESE, Germany;
John Grund,
University of Waikato, New Zealand; and
Boris Kötting,
University of Kaiserslautern, Germany

Contact:
Frank Maurer
maurer@cpsc.ucalgary.ca

Call for papers

The 4th ICSE workshop on "Software Engineering over the Internet" will bring together researchers and practitioners that try to use Internet technologies to overcome problems in distributed software development. The goal of the workshop is to exchange ideas how distributed projects can utilize the Internet to overcome communication, collaboration, and coordination problems. Furthermore, the workshop will discuss how standard SE practice can benefit from open-source approaches and vice-versa. As large companies are deploying Internet-based process support, a major focus shall be on case studies on distributed software development practice.

Sunday, May 13, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W3
2nd ICSE Workshop on Software Product Lines: Economics, Architectures, and Implications

One Day

Peter Knauber,
Fraunhofer IESE, Germany; and
Giancarlo Succi,
University of Alberta, Canada

Contacts:
Peter Knauber,
Peter.Knauber@iese.fhg.de
Giancarlo Succi
Giancarlo.Succi@ee.ualberta.ca

Call for papers

A product line is a set of products designed within a single strategy to exploit mutual synergies. Especially in areas where the competition is very high, companies adhering to a product line approach can benefit from cost reduction, decreased time-to-market, and quality improvement. These and other advantages often lead to better results in the market than the development of individual products alone. Following the remarkable success of the "First International Workshop on Software product lines: economics, architectures, and implications" held at ICSE 2000 in Limerick, the objective of this workshop is to bring together again people from industry and academia to investigate the proposals and the practices that pertain to the domain of software product lines.

Sunday, May 13, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W4
2nd International Workshop on Automated Program Analysis, Testing, and Verification (WAPATV)

One Day

Nigel Tracey,
University of York, UK; and
John Penix and
Willem C. Visser,
NASA Ames Research Center, USA

Contact:
Nigel Tracey
njt@cs.york.ac.uk

Call for papers

Software verification is an expensive process, typically costing upwards of 50% of the total software development costs. Automation has massive potential to reduce costs, increase quality and cut time-to-market. Many verification techniques exist and are being actively researched: static analysis, testing and formal verification. However, they have largely been applied as isolated technologies. Due to recent developments in static analysis, automated testing and automated program verification, the boundaries between these fields have begun to blur. There are many open questions regarding the integration of automated testing and verification, the relationships between different algorithms, and the use of static analysis to assist testing and verification.

The goal of this workshop is to gather the most active researchers and industrial practitioners from the fields of automated program analysis, testing and verification to discuss the overlap and integration between these fields. Relevant issues include theoretical foundations, tools and techniques, empirical studies and industrial experience.

The topics of interest include any aspect of automated program analysis, testing and verification from both industry and academia. These include, but is not limited to:

  • static analysis techniques for program reduction
  • static analysis techniques for error detection
  • automated testing and test-case generation
  • automated regression testing
  • industrial case studies
  • automated abstraction
  • technology transfer issues
  • integration of verification and testing techniques
  • analysis techniques to support verification/testing

Sunday, May 13, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


Sunday, May 13, 2001 to Monday, May 14, 2001

W5
Software Engineering and Mobility

Two Days

Gruia-Catalin Roman,
Washington University, St. Louis, USA; and
Gian Pietro Picco,
Politecnico di Milano, Italy

Contact:
Gruia-Catalin Roman
roman@cs.wustl.edu

Call for participation

Mobility is redefining the hardware and software fabric of distributed systems. Wireless communication allows network hosts to participate in a distributed computation while on the move. Novel middleware technologies allow software components to migrate across hosts for enhanced flexibility or performance. The software engineering implications of this wave of technological changes still await a thorough understanding. Researchers are invited to discuss fundamental models, emerging themes, research opportunities, technological trends, and market forces in the field of mobile computing and communication. The immediate objective is to provide a forum for intellectual debate. The ultimate goal is to define an influential research agenda for the area as a whole and to generate advocacy for it by stimulating new research initiatives.

Sunday, May 13, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W6
Software Visualization

Two Days

Wim De Pauw,
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, USA;
Steven P. Reiss,
Brown University, USA; and
John T. Stasko,
Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

Contact:
Steven Reiss
spr@cs.brown.edu

Call for papers

This workshop will look at current work in the area of software visualization with an emphasis on software understanding through visualization. It will explore new visualization techniques, addressing software problems through visualization, frameworks for gathering and analyzing data for software visualization, software visualization systems, and experiments and experiences with software visualization. In addition to providing an overview of current research in the area, it will provide a forum for discussions and cooperation among researchers in this and related areas.

Sunday, May 13, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


Monday, May 14, 2001

W7
Generative Techniques for Product Lines

One Day

Greg Butler,
Concordia University, Canada;
Don Batory,
University of Texas at Austin, USA;
Krzysztof Czarnecki,
DaimlerChrysler Research, Germany; and
Ulrich Eisenecker,
University of Applied Sciences, Kaiserslautern, Germany

Contact:
Greg Butler
gregb@cs.concordia.ca

Call for papers

A software product line leverages the knowledge of one or more domains in order to achieve short time-to-market, cost savings, and high quality software. The highest level of reuse comes by using domain-specific languages or visual builders to describe a member of the product line, and to generate the member from the description. Generative techniques can help us to capture the configuration knowledge for a product line and use it to generate concrete family members. This workshop focuses on technical issues of product lines, rather than economic issues.

Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W8
SEMINAL: Software Engineering using Metaheuristic INnovative ALgorithms

One Day

Mark Harman,
Brunel University, UK;
Bryan Jones,
University of Glamorgan, UK; and
Nigel Tracey,
University of York, UK

Contact:
Mark Harman
mark.harman@brunel.ac.uk

Call for papers

Metaheuristic algorithms, such as genetic algorithms and simulated annealing, have been applied successfully to a number of engineering problems ranging from load balancing in the process industries, through electromagnetic system design, to aircraft control and aerodynamics. It is surprising that these essentially software driven technologies have not yet fully penetrated the software engineering research community and are not widely applied when compared to the more traditional engineering disciplines.

Software engineers often face problems associated with the balancing of competing constraints, trade-offs between concerns and requirement imprecision. Perfect solutions are often either impossible or impractical. Therefore, like other engineering disciplines, software engineering is typically concerned with near optimal solutions or those which fall within a specified tolerance. It is precisely these factors which make robust metaheuristic search-based optimization techniques readily applicable.

The goal of the workshop is to broaden awareness within the software engineering community of metaheuristic algorithms and their application to software engineering problems and to bring together researchers and practitioners in software engineering and metaheuristics to build upon the embryonic community which currently occupies the intersection of the two fields.

Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W9
From Software Requirements to Architectures (STRAW 2001)

One Day

Jaelson Castro,
Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil; and
Jeff Kramer,
Imperial College, UK

Contact:
Jaelson Castro
jbc@cs.toronto.edu

Call for papers

Requirements Engineering and Software Architecture have become established areas of research, education and practice within the software engineering community for a considerable time. Despite the advances on both fronts we still need frameworks, techniques and tools to support the systematic achievement of architectural objectives in the context of complex stakeholders relationships. For example, little effort has been devoted to date to techniques for deriving architectural descriptions together with the requirement specifications. It also remains very difficult to show that a given software architecture satisfies a set of functional and non-functional requirements.  This is somewhat surprising, as software architecture has long been recognized to have a profound impact on the achievement of non-functional goals ("ilities") such as availability, reliability, maintainability, safety, confidentiality, evolvability, and so forth. Therefore greater effort should be devoted to bridging the gap between Requirements Engineering research and Software Architecture research.

Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W10
3rd International Workshop on Net-Centric Computing: Migrating to the Web (NCC 2001)

One Day

Jens H. Jahnke,
University of Victoria, Canada;
Kostas Kontogiannis,
University of Waterloo, Canada;
Eleni Stroulia,
University of Alberta, Canada;
Scott R. Tilley,
University of California, Riverside, USA; and
Kenny Wong,
University of Alberta, Canada

Contact:
Scott Tilley
stilley@cs.ucr.edu

Call for papers

The underlying principle of Net-Centric Computing (NCC) is a distributed environment where applications and data are downloaded from servers and exchanged with peers across a network on as as-needed basis. NCC relies on portable applications running on multiple platforms, mobile data accessed via high-speed network connections, and low-cost appliances for local processing. In keeping with the theme of "Migrating to the Web," the 3rd International Workshop on Net-Centric Computing (NCC 2001) will focus on issues related to reengineering legacy systems for use in an NCC environment. Of particular interest are holistic techniques for Web-enabling existing applications that integrate various reengineering aspects (e.g., code, data, and user interface reengineering) into a "whole system" modernization process. The workshop will be structured around three central issues: decomposing legacy systems to identify logical components representing essential functionality, developing a new Web-enabled system using these components, and deploying the new system in an NCC environment.

Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W11
Global Aspects of Software Engineering Professionalism

One Day

J. Barrie Thompson and
Helen M. Edwards,
University of Sunderland, UK

Contact:
Barrie Thompson
barrie.thompson@sunderland.ac.uk

Call for papers

The workshop will to provide a forum to consider the global dimensions of a Software Engineering Profession and determine the relevance and usefulness to the Software Engineering community of an initiative by the International Federation of Information Processing (IFIP) concerning harmonization of professional standards. The prime objectives of the workshop will be to examine:

  • The current situation with regard to certification of licensing in different countries
  • The drivers and constraints regarding Software Engineering Professionalism
    and to determine:
  • The extent to which world-wide Software Engineering Professionalism is achievable (particularly in the light of IFIP’s proposals)
  • Possible strategies that would assist in achieving such world-wide Software Engineering Professionalism.

Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


Monday, May 14, 2001 to Tuesday, May 15, 2001

W12
3rd International Workshop on Economics-Driven Software Engineering Research (EDSER)

Two Days

Kevin J. Sullivan,
University of Virginia, USA;
Mary Shaw,
Carnegie Mellon University, USA;
Barry Boehm,
University of Southern California, USA;
David Notkin,
University of Washington, USA; and
Warren Harrison,
Portland State University, USA

Contact:
Kevin Sullivan
sullivan@virginia.edu

Call for papers

The overall objective of the Third International Workshop on Economics-Driven Software Engineering Research (EDSER-3) is to advance the theory and the practice of software design and engineering by viewing them as value-seeking activities.  The term value is construed broadly. It includes but is not limited to meaning monetary value in capital markets. Other dimensions in which value can be defined include national security, solution of major social problems, the advance of democratic society and values, and so forth. To date, the field of software economics has focused largely on cost estimation, largely ignoring benefits and their realization. We now need a theory and practice of software design and engineering that is based on modeling of, and design and dynamic management for, net value creation, including costs and benefits, risks and opportunities. Sources for theoretical insights and advances can be found in many quarters: finance, strategy, decision theory, game theory, politics, ethics, aesthetics.  EDSER-3 seeks leading-edge contributions that can advance the emerging discussion in this area.

Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 15, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W13
4th ICSE Workshop on Component-Based Software Engineering: Component Certification and System Prediction

Two Days

Ivica Crnkovic,
Malardalens University, Sweden; and
Heinz Schmidt,
Monash University, Australia; and
Judith Stafford and
Kurt Wallnau,
Carnegie Mellon Software Engineering Institute, USA

Contact:
Judith Stafford
jas@sei.cmu.edu

Call for papers

Components play a critical role in many software systems. Such systems suffer from (1) a lack of information about component behaviour (or lack of confidence in the information that is available), and (2) an inability to determine properties of the whole system from properties of the parts. CBSE4 will bring together researchers and practitioners from the areas of component trust and certification, component technology, and software architecture to ensure that work in the areas of certification of software components and architectural analyses for prediction of system quality attributes will be mutually aware, if not mutually reinforcing. The output of the workshop will be a defined set of community model problems that reflects this intersection of interests.

Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 15, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W14
10th International Workshop on Software Configuration Management: New Practices, New Challenges, and New Boundaries (SCM 10)

Two Days

André van der Hoek,
University of California, Irvine, USA

Contact:
André van der Hoek
andre@ics.uci.edu

Call for papers

The goal of SCM-10 is to bring together industrial and academic researchers from a variety of disciplines to investigate and determine the future of configuration management. SCM-10 specifically aims to step outside of its traditional boundary of just managing source code, and is intended to be a rich, open forum for discussing such issues as component-based CM, CM for Open Source projects, Web-site management, hypermedia, deployment, the relation between dynamism, run-time change, and CM, and other such relevant topics. Discussion will be fueled via several invited presentations and presentations based on materials drawn from submitted position papers.

Monday, May 14, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 15, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


Tuesday, May 15, 2001

W15
XML Technologies and Software Engineering (XSE 2001)

One Day

Cecilia Mascolo,
Wolfgang Emmerich, and
Anthony Finkelstein,
University College London, UK

Contact:
Cecilia Mascolo
c.mascolo@cs.ucl.ac.uk

Call for papers

The aim of this workshop is to bring together the efforts in the areas of software engineering with XML and engineering software with XML. The first stream addresses the use of XML and related technologies for the construction of software engineering tools and environments. The second stream focuses on the exploitation of XML for the development of new generations of distributed software architectures and middleware in order to provide new degrees of flexibility in terms of integration, security, and interoperability. The focus of the workshop stretches from pure research on XML and related technologies to applications and reports of industrial experience with mark-up languages and tools. Technologies relevant to the workshop include XML, XSL, DOM, XLink, XPath, Schema, SOAP, Biztalk, XML Query, XMI, XPL, and RDF.

Tuesday, May 15, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W16
Describing Software Architecture with UML

One Day

Alan Brown,
Catapulse, Inc., USA;
Wojtek Kozaczynski,
Rational Software, Inc., USA;
Philippe Kruchten,
Rational Software Canada Corporation, Canada; and
Grant Larsen,
Catapulse, Inc., USA

Contact:
Philippe Kruchten
pbk@rational.com

Call for papers

This workshop focuses on the use the UML for representing and modeling architectures of software-intensive systems. We will look at experience reports, discuss UML subsets and patterns of use, and examine identified difficulties and limitations. How can UML support IEEE 1471? How does it map to ADLs? How can we use a model-based architectural representation fo to ADLs? How can we use a model-based architectural representation for reasoning about various architectural qualities: performance, scalability, robustness, fault-tolerance, safety, or security? We will look at extending UML via stereotypes and UML profiles to support representation of architectures and possible extensions or improvements in the future UML 2.0 to help reason about architectural issues.

Tuesday, May 15, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W17
Advanced Separation of Concerns in Software Engineering

One Day

Peri Tarr,
IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, USA

Contact:
Peri Tarr
tarr@watson.ibm.com

Call for participation

Separation of concerns can provide a host of well-known and crucial benefits, but only if the concerns that are separated and modularized match the concerns one needs to deal withùwhich can be of dramatically different kinds in different development contexts. Traditional modularization approaches have proven inadequate. Work in the growing area of advanced separation of concerns seeks to provide more powerful and flexible modularization, capable of encapsulating multiple kinds of overlapping, interacting and crosscutting concerns. This workshop is intended to bring together researchers and practitioners in this and related areas, to explore some of the many open issues.

Tuesday, May 15, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.


W18
1st Workshop on Open Source Software Engineering

One Day

Joseph Feller,
Brian Fitzgerald,
University College Cork, Ireland; and
André van der Hoek,
University of California, Irvine, USA

Contact:
Joseph Feller
jfeller@afis.ucc.ie

Call for position papers

Open Source Software (OSS) has recently become the focus of considerable interest, yet there remains a need for rigorous analytical inquiry into the subject. This workshop seeks to articulate OSS as an SE paradigm, addressing the requirements of OSS in terms of methodology and process, tools and enabling technologies, and human resources and project management. Format: Round-Table Discussion. Size: Maximum 40 participants. Position Papers Required. The Workshop Report will be published in a special issue of IEE Proceedings - Software on Open Source Software Engineering, and workshop participants will be encouraged to submit full research papers based on their position papers for possible inclusion in the special issue.

Tuesday, May 15, 2001; 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.



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